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A New HeartlandWomen, Modernity, and the Agrarian Ideal in America$
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Janet Gallingani Casey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195338959

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195338959.001.0001

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Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Radical Ruralities

Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Radical Ruralities

Chapter:
(p.123) Chapter 4 Radical Ruralities
Source:
A New Heartland
Author(s):

Janet Galligani Casey (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195338959.003.0005

This chapter investigates how and why certain Left-leaning women novelists used the conservative setting of the farm as a site for subversive revisionings of gender, class, and race in modern America. It posits that such women were attracted to rurality as a signifying space that points in two directions at once: toward a heightened social orthodoxy that lays bare the injustices that a modern world must rectify, and toward fresh theoretical frameworks that explode social conventions. In particular, this chapter addresses especially the ways that women’s radical rural novels played on the “natural” setting of the farm to retheorize women’s corporeality. It includes substantial close readings of texts by Edith Summers Kelley, Olive Tilford Dargan, and Josephine Johnson.

Keywords:   Left, gender, class, race, rural novels, corporeality, Edith Summers Kelley, Olive Tilford Dargan, Josephine Johnson

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