Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Medical MiraclesDoctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jacalyn Duffin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195336504

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336504.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 August 2019

The Doctors

The Doctors

Medical Knowledge in the Canonization Process

Chapter:
(p.113) 4 The Doctors
Source:
Medical Miracles
Author(s):

Jacalyn Duffin (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336504.003.0005

The canonization process always sought the input of doctors wielding the most up-to-date diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Over time, the average number of physicians involved steadily increased. Consultants sometimes argued over the diagnosis or management. Local experts were invoked to ascertain the physical condition of the supposedly cured patient, or to comment on the extraordinary nature of the events. The average number of medical experts also increased through time.

The investigation annoyed some doctors; others were defensive, especially when the testimony was elicited many years after the cure. Originally a question about the religious practices of witnesses was a key part of their testimony. Eventually, medical witnesses were not required to be practicing Catholics; some were Protestants or Jews. In all cases, the doctors’ testimony was sought for its scientific content and clinical expertise. Miracles take place when the doctor is surprised by the outcome of desperate situations.

Keywords:   physicians, miracles, testimony, medical disagreement, recovery, cure, surprise

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .