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American Geography and GeographersToward Geographical Science$
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Geoffrey J. Martin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780195336023

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.001.0001

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The Path to War, 1914–1918

The Path to War, 1914–1918

Chapter:
(p.528) 9 The Path to War, 1914–1918
Source:
American Geography and Geographers
Author(s):

Geoffrey Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.003.0009

When the United States began to support its allies, correspondence with German geographers diminished. D. W. Johnson and W. H. Hobbs, along with French geographers who visited the United States, filled the void, developing propaganda while informing Bowman and governmental officials of the geographic work being done in Paris. The American Expeditionary Force, which included geologists and geographers, was active by September 1917. In the army camps, U.S. geographers gave lectures with the aid of handbooks, maps, and other services. Geography courses were introduced on many campuses, and literature, maps, and atlases were provided for students. Advances were made in meteorology, aerial photo-topographic mapping, agriculture, and mineral production. The U.S. War Trade Board, the U.S. Shipping Board, and Military Intelligence were established on a military footing.

Keywords:   camps, conscription, geographers, maps, handbooks

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