Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
American Geography and GeographersToward Geographical Science$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Geoffrey J. Martin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780195336023

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 October 2019

Envoi

Envoi

Chapter:
(p.1135) 19 Envoi
Source:
American Geography and Geographers
Author(s):

Geoffrey Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.003.0019

The archival holding is the essential matter in the construction of a history of any of the intellectual disciplines. In itself the archival unit is devoid of bias, dishonesty, and ignorance. It establishes priority in the matter of scientific accomplishment, while it facilitates philosophy and the scale of a history. Hence the resort to the quest for archival data in those countries where geographer activities have been recorded and exchanged in correspondence with U.S. personnel. These collections may be very large or small; they may be held privately or in university “special collections,” in geographical societies, in local or national libraries, or in national archives. Too often accumulations of correspondence, notes, papers, et al. are lost or destroyed, as some geographers prefer posthumous privacy, and with the destruction goes a part of our history which is irreplaceable. What has remained to us is, however, large in amount, well maintained, and of significance to the geographer. It is from these collections (both at home and abroad) that we are able to reconstruct a more accurate history of our field of learning.

Keywords:   archival deposits, biography, correspondents, definition, Nicaragua Canal Project, Inquiry, Leo Baeck Institute

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .