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American Geography and GeographersToward Geographical Science$
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Geoffrey J. Martin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780195336023

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.001.0001

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The Emergence of a Political Geography

The Emergence of a Political Geography

Chapter:
(p.812) 14 The Emergence of a Political Geography
Source:
American Geography and Geographers
Author(s):

Geoffrey Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.003.0014

Political geography, brought to eminence by F. Ratzel, followed by A. T. Mahan, H. J. Mackinder, and J. Scott Keltie, made its way into curricula of U.S. universities by the 1890s. Squabbles between nations such as British Guiana and Venezuela, as well as World War I, invited more serious studies in this genre. In the United States, Bowman’s The New World dominated the geographic scene, while Brunhes and Vallaux were also well noticed, as was the emergence of German geopolitics. Encouraged and developed by R. Hartshorne, D. S. Whittlesey, S. B. Jones, and L. Martin, political geography began to emerge more fully in American universities. Bowman’s role with Foreign Affairs also related to political geography, as did his relationship with members of Roosevelt’s governing body as World War II approached. Throughout the war and thereafter, political geography became increasingly significant for geographers and officialdom.

Keywords:   Mackinder, Mahan, Lebensraum, Kjellen, Geopolitics, Jones, Hartshorne

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