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American Geography and GeographersToward Geographical Science$
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Geoffrey J. Martin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780195336023

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.001.0001

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The Path to Peace, 1917–1920

The Path to Peace, 1917–1920

Chapter:
(p.586) 10 The Path to Peace, 1917–1920
Source:
American Geography and Geographers
Author(s):

Geoffrey Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195336023.003.0010

Commencing in 1918, geographers and scholars from other fields of learning undertook a vast study of possibilities for consideration at the forthcoming Paris Peace Conference. This undertaking, completed largely in the building of the American Geographical Society of New York City, was known as “The Inquiry.” Selected specialists of this group traveled to Paris and advised President Wilson and the Commissioners Plenipotentiary, a process leading to the Treaty of Versailles, which reduced Germany in size and economy. Large numbers of maps were produced to fill the possible needs of allies and members of the American delegation while negotiations were in process. In this and the pursuant settlements with Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Turkey, geographers were much involved with both texts and maps. As a result of this intense activity, the American contingent was appreciated as the most adequately prepared delegation present, though the French and the British contingents were well invested, entering their best minds into these negotiations. As a result of hostilities, American geographers turned their attention from the accomplishments of German geography to those of French geographers.

Keywords:   Inquiry, Bowman, boundaries, cartography, Versailles

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