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Sense of Place and Sense of PlanetThe Environmental Imagination of the Global$
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Ursula K Heise

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195335637

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335637.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Some Like It Hot: Climate Change and Eco-Cosmopolitanism

Chapter:
(p.205) CONCLUSION
Source:
Sense of Place and Sense of Planet
Author(s):

Ursula K. Heise (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335637.003.0008

This brief chapter concludes the book by looking at the to-date relatively sparse output of novels and films on the issue of climate change. It investigates the narrative and cinematographic difficulties of representing global risk and the transnational communities it generates in cultural forms that evolved historically to represent individuals, families, and in some cases nations, but rarely the planet as a whole. In the analysis of works that have addressed climate change, this chapter returns to David Brin’s novel Earth as a paradigmatic example of how a text combines epic and modernist fragmentation so as to convey a sense of both the local and the global, in a literary manifestation of the eco-cosmopolitan awareness formulated in Chs. 1 and 4.

Keywords:   climate change, global warming, David Brin, epic, cosmopolitanism, globalization, transnationalism

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