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The Political Psychology of Democratic Citizenship$
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Eugene Borgida, Christopher M Federico, and John L Sullivan

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195335453

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335453.001.0001

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Racial Stereotyping and Political Attitudes: The View From Political Science

Racial Stereotyping and Political Attitudes: The View From Political Science

Chapter:
(p.247) Chapter 11 Racial Stereotyping and Political Attitudes: The View From Political Science
Source:
The Political Psychology of Democratic Citizenship
Author(s):

Mark Peffley (Contributor Webpage)

Jon Hurwitz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335453.003.0011

While political science has made effective use of research on the psychology of stereotyping, psychology has not benefited from political science in the same way. This chapter argues that the study of racial stereotypes can be improved by a mutual effort on the part of political scientists and psychologists alike to better understand and apply the methods and perspectives that dominate each discipline. Discussion focuses on three principal disciplinary contrasts. First, while psychology has typically been concerned with the processes underlying stereotypes, political science has focused on the collective sources and political consequences of stereotyping. Second, while political science could benefit from more experimentation, psychologists should implement research designs to enhance the external validity of their research. Finally, both disciplines are limited to the extent that they typically focus on the beliefs of the dominant group, and stereotyping research would benefit from a greater emphasis on the beliefs of racial minorities.

Keywords:   stereotyping, social cognition, racial attitudes, stereotype content, political attitudes

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