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Race and the Politics of Solidarity$
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Juliet Hooker

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195335361

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335361.001.0001

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Multiculturalism and Solidarity in Nicaragua

Multiculturalism and Solidarity in Nicaragua

Chapter:
(p.129) 4 Multiculturalism and Solidarity in Nicaragua
Source:
Race and the Politics of Solidarity
Author(s):

Juliet Hooker (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195335361.003.0005

What is the effect of the institutional design of minority group rights on political solidarity? Can debates about such rights begin to address racialized solidarity? This chapter examines these questions more concretely by analyzing the model of multiculturalism adopted in Nicaragua, where multiple indigenous and Afro-descendant groups requiring remedies for both racialized oppression and the accommodation of cultural difference are present (as in Latin America generally). The Nicaraguan case is analyzed in order to evaluate the kinds of minority group rights that might best enable the fair accommodation of ethnocultural diversity, remedy racialized oppression, and foster political solidarity. It suggests that debates about such rights can begin to address racialized solidarity by ushering in contestation about the content of public memory, but only if and when arguments for these rights reveal the existence of a state organized on the basis of cultural difference and racial hierarchy.

Keywords:   multiculturalism, solidarity, Nicaragua, minority group rights, indigenous groups, Afro-descendant groups, racialized oppression, cultural accommodation, racialized solidarity, public memory

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