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The Science of Social Vision$
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Reginald B. Adams, Nalini Ambady, Ken Nakayama, and Shinsuke Shimojo

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195333176

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

Aftereffects Reveal That Adaptive Face-Coding Mechanisms Are Selective for Race and Sex

Aftereffects Reveal That Adaptive Face-Coding Mechanisms Are Selective for Race and Sex

Chapter:
(p.347) Chapter 20 Aftereffects Reveal That Adaptive Face-Coding Mechanisms Are Selective for Race and Sex
Source:
The Science of Social Vision
Author(s):

Gillian Rhodes

Emma Jaquet

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195333176.003.0021

This chapter uses face aftereffects to examine the role of adaptive mechanisms in forming visual representations of faces. It argues that such mechanisms may underlie our remarkable ability to distinguish thousands of faces, despite their similarity, as visual patterns—an ability that is fundamental to human social interaction. It demonstrates that these mechanisms are sensitive to important social dimensions of faces, such as their sex and race. This selectivity may increase our capacity to discriminate faces relative to a system that codes the same visual information for all faces.

Keywords:   adaptive mechanisms, face-coding, visual representation, faces, social interaction, face discrimination

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