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American LazarusReligion and the Rise of African American and Native American Literatures$
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Joanna Brooks

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195332919

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332919.001.0001

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Prince Hall Freemasonry: Secrecy, Authority, and Culture

Prince Hall Freemasonry: Secrecy, Authority, and Culture

Boston, Massachusetts; February 1789

Chapter:
(p.114) (p.115) 4 Prince Hall Freemasonry: Secrecy, Authority, and Culture
Source:
American Lazarus
Author(s):

Joanna Brooks

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332919.003.0005

This chapter examines three foundational texts in the history of Prince Hall Freemasonry: John Marrant's Sermon to the African Lodge of the Honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons (1789) and Prince Hall's Charges to the lodge at Charlestown (1792) and Menotomy (1797). Hall and Marrant delivered these speeches at public celebrations of Masonic holidays. There, before audiences of black and white Bostonians, they revealed that the legacy of ancient Egypt and the biblical destiny of Ethiopia belonged to African Americans. And, according to Hall and Marrant, this destiny was already unfolding.

Keywords:   John Marrant, Prince Hall, speeches, Masonic holidays

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