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Bad FormSocial Mistakes and the Nineteenth-Century Novel$
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Kent Puckett

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195332759

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332759.001.0001

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Some Blunders

Some Blunders

Chapter:
(p.14) CHAPTER 1 Some Blunders
Source:
Bad Form
Author(s):

Kent Puckett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195332759.003.0002

This chapter begins by looking at the social mistake in relation both to the novel and to the rather sudden appearance of the etiquette book in the second quarter of the nineteenth century. While there had long been other works on manners—courtesy manuals, conduct books, etc.—the etiquette book differed from what came before because it made its case for of good form without offering the reader a stable ethical ideal. In the absence of shared social or cultural ends, the mistake emerges as an object that is at once reliable and disturbing. Then, in the context readings of eating peas with your knife in Thackeray and pointing at people in Balzac, the chapter develops a psychoanalytically inflected theory of the social mistake both in general and in relation to the particular form of the nineteenth-century novel.

Keywords:   bad form, good form, etiquette, manners, social mistake, the novel, narrative omniscience, Honore de Balzac, William Makepeace Thackeray

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