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ReputationA Network Interpretation$
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Kenneth H. Craik

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195330922

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195330922.001.0001

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Buzz and Bins

Buzz and Bins

The Discursive and Distributive Facets of Reputation

Chapter:
(p.59) 4 Buzz and Bins
Source:
Reputation
Author(s):

Kenneth H. Craik

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195330922.003.0004

This chapter identifies theoretical elements that generate two major aspects of reputation—the discursive facet, dealing with information actively flowing through the person’s reputational network, and the distributive facet, dealing with latent information stored within the network’s person bins. They constitute the two distinct forms in which the common knowledge of the specific person is socially represented. The term fama was a culturally rich concept in medieval Europe that referred to what was generally said about events or actions, as well as what was generally said about a person. Within modern social psychology, the theory of social representation holds that everyday talk and common knowledge continue to play a central and pervasive role in contemporary culture.

Keywords:   fama, social representations, discursive reputation, distributive reputation, social psychology

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