Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
ReputationA Network Interpretation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kenneth H. Craik

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195330922

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195330922.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 July 2019

Social Communication About Specific Persons

Social Communication About Specific Persons

Information Flow

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Social Communication About Specific Persons
Source:
Reputation
Author(s):

Kenneth H. Craik

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195330922.003.0002

This chapter analyzes the ongoing social communication process through which news, observations, and impressions about an individual circulate along that person’s reputational network via chat, gossip sessions, occasions of qualified privilege, and more formal means. In the network interpretation of reputation, the daily ebb and flow of information through the media of various forms of communication and discourse will be deemed the “discursive reputation,” referring to what is said about the person. Reputational networks are activated by social communication. In everyday life, we are surrounded by and awash in chat and gossip, and much of it is about specific persons. Much of what we know about most individuals we claim to know is indirect in this sense, derived from everyday, informal surveillance.

Keywords:   information flow, chat, gossip sessions, qualified privilege, informal surveillance

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .