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Oh Joy! Oh Rapture!The Enduring Phenomenon of Gilbert and Sullivan$
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Ian Bradley

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195328943

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328943.001.0001

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Unfriended, Unprotected, and Alone: The New D’Oyly Carte, 1988–2003

Unfriended, Unprotected, and Alone: The New D’Oyly Carte, 1988–2003

Chapter:
(p.53) Three Unfriended, Unprotected, and Alone: The New D’Oyly Carte, 1988–2003
Source:
Oh Joy! Oh Rapture!
Author(s):

Ian Bradley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328943.003.0003

The old D'Oyly Carte company survived for 107 years, its successor for just fifteen before announcing in May 2003 that it was ceasing performing for the foreseeable future. For most of that time, it was in the state that Major General Stanley feared for himself if the pirates of Penzance robbed him of his daughters — unfriended, unprotected, and alone. Castigated by traditionalists and fans of the old company, it never really established a house style and was if anything even more shamefully treated by the Arts Council than its predecessor had been. The new D'Oyly Carte Opera Company opened at the Grand Theatre, Sunderland, on April 28, 1988. The new D'Oyly Carte company has, like its predecessor, been a victim of the persistent cultural snobbery and prejudice against Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain. It has lived through many false dawns and unfulfilled promises.

Keywords:   Arts Council, Major General Stanley, Gilbert and Sullivan, Britain, cultural snobbery

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