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Imaging the Aging Brain$
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William Jagust and Mark D'Esposito

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195328875

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328875.001.0001

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Databasing the Aging Brain

Databasing the Aging Brain

Chapter:
(p.351) 21 Databasing the Aging Brain
Source:
Imaging the Aging Brain
Author(s):

John Darrell

Van Horn

Arthur W. Toga

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195328875.003.0021

Large-scale archives of primary neuroimaging data of older populations are an essential element for contemporary research into normal and disease processes associated with aging. In this chapter, we describe the role of digital atlases of the human brain in aging research and how these resources are created, point to several such formal atlases that may be used for neuroimage data processing, as well as discuss why atlases require periodic revision. We also discuss neuroimaging data repositories related specifically to aging and to age-related disease, the role of databases in making inferences concerning functional activation, and their potential for data mining, meta-analysis, and model construction.

Keywords:   neuroimaging, databases, aging, Alzheimer's disease, structure, function, brain atlases

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