Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Beyond Yellow EnglishToward a Linguistic Anthropology of Asian Pacific America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Angela Reyes and Adrienne Lo

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195327359

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327359.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

Phonological and Cultural Innovations in the Speech of Samoans in Southern California

Phonological and Cultural Innovations in the Speech of Samoans in Southern California

Chapter:
(p.233) 14 Phonological and Cultural Innovations in the Speech of Samoans in Southern California
Source:
Beyond Yellow English
Author(s):

Alessandro Duranti

Jennifer F. Reynolds

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195327359.003.0014

Bilingualism is a concept that relies on a variety of theoretical constructs, including the notions of “language,” “speakers,” and “community.” Subjecting these key notions to empirical and theoretical challenges, this study applies an anthropological approach to bilingualism's most emblematic phenomenon, code‐switching. Audio‐visual recordings of spontaneous interactions collected in a Samoan community in Southern California are examined. Three phenomena are considered: (1) the routine adoption of kinship terms (Dad and Mom) in Samoan discourse; (2) the “island‐like” status of proper names which are not adapted to the Samoan phonological register called “bad speech” spoken at home; (3) the code‐switching to Samoan words that do have an English equivalent and are associated with church activities. It is argued that these phenomena are indexes of social change, revealing that Samoan parents in the U.S. tend to take the child's point of view and that persons are constructed as less contextualized, more permanent entities.

Keywords:   code‐switching, anthropological approach, indexes of social change, kinship terms, proper names

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .