Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Writing the RaptureProphecy Fiction in Evangelical America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Crawford Gribben

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195326604

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326604.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 May 2019

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.167) Conclusion
Source:
Writing the Rapture
Author(s):

Crawford Gribben (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326604.003.0009

The conclusion provides a brief reflection on the argument of this book. It notes that evangelical prophecy fiction has complicated the narrative of American modernity by demonstrating that evangelicals are no longer a minor subculture. But it also notes that this social expansion has disguised the monochrome cultural assumptions of the novels and their implied readers. Most evangelical prophecy fiction has been written by and for white American men. But this consistent specificity of gender and race should not be allowed to obscure the ideological variety that haunts the narrative form. Evangelical prophecy fiction emerged from the high point of Protestant America, witnessed to its defeat, and participated in its eventual reconstruction and return. But in doing so, the conclusion argues, it may have reinvented American evangelicalism itself.

Keywords:   modernity, subculture, gender, race, Protestant, evangelicalism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .