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The Passions of Christ in High-Medieval ThoughtAn Essay on Christological Development$
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Kevin Madigan

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195322743

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195322743.001.0001

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 Christus Orans?

 Christus Orans?

A Praying God?

Chapter:
(p.73) 7 Christus Orans?
Source:
The Passions of Christ in High-Medieval Thought
Author(s):

Kevin Madigan (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195322743.003.0007

In the tenth book of De Trinitate, Hilary of Poitiers gave extended consideration to the motive and meaning of three prayers from the passion narrative: “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me” (Matt 26:39); “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matt 27:46; Mark 15:34); and “Father, into your hands I commend my Spirit” (Luke 23:46). All three prayers were used by the Arians in an attempt to establish the ontological inferiority of the Son to the Father. In fact, Hilary states that the latter two prayers comprise, together, the “chief weapons” in the Arian campaign to deny the divinity of the Son. This chapter focuses upon key ancient and medieval inquiries into the question: why did the Incarnate Son pray?

Keywords:   De Trinitate, Arians, Hilary of Poitiers, Jesus, pray, Incarnate Son

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