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Family RelationshipsAn Evolutionary Perspective$
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Catherine A. Salmon and Todd K. Shackelford

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195320510

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320510.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 October 2019

Temperament as a Biological Mechanism for Mate Choice: A Hypothesis and Preliminary Data

Temperament as a Biological Mechanism for Mate Choice: A Hypothesis and Preliminary Data

Chapter:
(p.275) 13 Temperament as a Biological Mechanism for Mate Choice: A Hypothesis and Preliminary Data
Source:
Family Relationships
Author(s):

Helen E. Fisher

Heide D. Island

Marchalik Daniel

Rich Jonathan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320510.003.0013

This chapter discusses investigations based on Fisher's hypothesis that among the myriad cultural and biological forces that contribute to mate choice, men and women tend to be attracted to potential mates who have a somewhat different genetic profile associated with different cognitive and behavioral traits, an unconscious attraction mechanism that enables mating partners to create more genetic variety in their offspring and co-parent their young with a wider array of parenting skills. The chapter concludes that the results of these pilot projects provide enough preliminary data to warrant further pursuit of this line of investigation into the biological mechanisms associated with mate choice.

Keywords:   biological mechanisms, parenting, cognitive traits, genetic profile

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