Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Camille Saint-SaënsOn Music and Musicians$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Roger Nichols

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195320169

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320169.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 May 2019

Jacques Offenbach II

Jacques Offenbach II

(Ecole buissonnière, Pierre Lafitte, 1913, 301–307)

Chapter:
22 Jacques Offenbach II
Source:
Camille Saint-Saëns
Author(s):

Roger Nichols

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320169.003.0022

In speaking of Offenbach, the author did justice to his marvelous natural gifts and deplored the way he had squandered them. He was proven wrong as Offenbach came back into fashion. As the public cannot bring itself to do without gaiety, it turned to operetta and, naturally, to the man who was its creator and prolific purveyor. The word “purveyor” is not out of place, because Offenbach was not interested in creating art; gifted as he was with comic verve and an unquenchable fount of tunefulness, his only idea was to feed the theatre of which he was simultaneously the director and, to all intents and purposes, the exclusive composer. But harmonic inventions are rare in Offenbach. What makes him interesting is a richness and fertility of melodic invention that has few equals. He used to improvise endlessly, and at extraordinary speed.

Keywords:   Jacques Offenbach, operetta, improvise, theatre

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .