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Becoming African in AmericaRace and Nation in the Early Black Atlantic, 1760-1830$
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James Sidbury

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195320107

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320107.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and Renewed Assertions of African Identity

Chapter:
(p.203) Epilogue
Source:
Becoming African in America
Author(s):

James Sidbury (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320107.003.0009

The epilogue looks ahead to the reemergence of black discussions of African identity and black emigrationism during the 1850s. It examines the efforts of Martin R. Delany, sometimes called the “father of African nationalism”, to encourage black emigration from the United States during the 1850s, and to the sense of African identity that he articulated while advocating emigration. The epilogue suggests the persistence of many ideas initially offered by the first generations of self-styled “Africans”, and some of the costs of the demise of the remarkable vision that activists like Equiano, Allen, Coker, and Cuffe had developed.

Keywords:   African identity, black emigration, Martin D. Delany, African nationalism

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