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Law, Reason, and the Cosmic CityPolitical Philosophy in the Early Stoa$
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Katja Maria Vogt

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195320091

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320091.001.0001

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Wisdom: Sages and Gods

Wisdom: Sages and Gods

Chapter:
(p.111) 3 Wisdom: Sages and Gods
Source:
Law, Reason, and the Cosmic City
Author(s):

Katja Maria Vogt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195320091.003.0004

The ideal of wisdom—and citizenship in the cosmos—is explored in detail, both regarding ideal human agents and gods. The view that the sage is strictly omniscient is rejected; rather, the sage's knowledge is knowledge relevant to the leading of a lawful life. The reconstruction of the conception of citizen—gods leads into a core question of Stoic theology: how a plural conception of ‘gods’ fits into Stoic physics, which considers God (in the singular) the first principle. It is argued that the gods of the Stoics are portions of pneuma, and some of them are celestial bodies. The life of the gods exemplifies the Stoics' ideal of an easy flow of life: the planets are considered models of perfect deliberation, being—through their perfect action—fully integrated into the movements of the universe as a whole.

Keywords:   Stoic theology, Stoic physics, wisdom, knowledge, ignorance, easy flow of life, citizengods, gods, God, planets

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