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Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems$
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Rosalind James and Theresa L. Pitts-Singer

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195316957

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316957.001.0001

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Pollinating Bees Crucial to Farming Wildflower Seed for U.S. Habitat Restoration

Pollinating Bees Crucial to Farming Wildflower Seed for U.S. Habitat Restoration

Chapter:
(p.48) 4 Pollinating Bees Crucial to Farming Wildflower Seed for U.S. Habitat Restoration
Source:
Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems
Author(s):

James H. Cane

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316957.003.0004

Federal land managers desire seed of Great Basin perennial wildflowers, mixed with grass and shrub seed, for restoration of millions of acres of sagebrush communities degraded by altered wildfire regimes and exotic grasses and forbs. For fifteen candidate wildflower species to be farmed for seed production, all were found to need pollinators, typically bees (Apiformes), for fruit and seed production. Some can be pollinated with currently managed bees (honey bees, alfalfa leafcutting bees), but for others, management protocols and starting populations are being developed for suitable species of native Osmia bees.

Keywords:   pollination, pollinators, bees, restoration, Osmia, Apiformes, wildflowers, Great Basin

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