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Social NeuroscienceToward Understanding the Underpinnings of the Social Mind$
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Alexander Todorov, Susan Fiske, and Deborah Prentice

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195316872

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316872.001.0001

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You, Me, and My Brain

You, Me, and My Brain

Self and Other Representations in Social Cognitive Neuroscience

Chapter:
(p.14) Chapter 2 You, Me, and My Brain
Source:
Social Neuroscience
Author(s):

Jamil Zaki

Kevin Ochsner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316872.003.0002

How do we reconcile our tendencies to think of others as being similar to us with the importance and ease of seeing ourselves as different from others? This chapter adopts a social cognitive neuroscience (SCN) approach to address this issue, using information about the brain to constrain thinking about the psychological processes involved in perceiving people. It reviews neuroimaging research on self-perception, emotion, and social cognition with an eye toward understanding the person perception processes that lead to our dual tendencies to see others as both like and not like ourselves. It reviews neuroimaging research on self-perception, emotion, and social cognition with an eye toward understanding the person perception processes that lead to our dual tendencies to see others as both like and not like ourselves. It differentiates between two modes of processing information about people—one that is a quick, direct, and bottom-up and another that is deliberative, reflective, and top-down. The chapter then examines whether self and other overlap may depend critically on which mode of processing perceivers are engaging.

Keywords:   social cognitive neuroscience, social cognition, perception, neuroimaging studies, self-perception

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