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Social Work With African American MalesHealth, Mental Health, and Social Policy$
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Waldo E. Johnson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314366

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314366.001.0001

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Health and Young African American Men

Health and Young African American Men

An Inside View

Chapter:
(p.195) 11 Health and Young African American Men
Source:
Social Work With African American Males
Author(s):

Joseph E. Ravenell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314366.003.0011

Young and middle-aged African American men (15-45 years old) are disproportionately affected by accidental injury, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and cardiovascular disease. These conditions are preventable and are amenable to primary care intervention, yet African American men underutilize primary care health services. Because health-care utilization is strongly dependent on health beliefs among other factors, this chapter identifies and explores African American men's perceptions of health and health influences. It analyzes focus group interviews with select subgroups of African American men, including adolescents, trauma survivors, and HIV-positive men. Their definitions of health and beliefs about influences on health are elicited. The chapter provides insight into African American males' general health perceptions, and may have implications for future efforts to improve healthcare utilization and health in this population. Recommendations for future directions to improve African American males' health are explored.

Keywords:   African American men, health care services, health perceptions, health care utilization

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