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Social Work With African American MalesHealth, Mental Health, and Social Policy$
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Waldo E. Johnson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314366

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314366.001.0001

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School Engagement, Peer Influences, and Sexual Behaviors Among High School African American Adolescent Boys

School Engagement, Peer Influences, and Sexual Behaviors Among High School African American Adolescent Boys

Chapter:
(p.101) 6 School Engagement, Peer Influences, and Sexual Behaviors Among High School African American Adolescent Boys
Source:
Social Work With African American Males
Author(s):

Dexter R. Voisin

Torsten B. Neilands

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314366.003.0006

This chapter shows that African American adolescent males are disproportionately infected with HIV compared to their White counterparts. While factors like early sexual debut, sex without condoms, and a higher number of sexual partners may in part account for such disparities, the factors associated with such risk behaviors remain unclear. The literature suggests that parents are critical in keeping adolescents safe. However, there is a dearth of research on African American adolescent males in relation to family constellation and sexual risk behaviors. A self-administered survey was used to examine family characteristics, parental support, peer networks, and HIV sexual risk behaviors among 171 African American high school males. The results suggest that cultural factors may weigh more heavily than family structure, which has been traditionally viewed as the discerning factor in assessing sexual behavior.

Keywords:   HIV, sexual behavior, African American males, teenagers, academic achievement

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