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Graph Design for the Eye and Mind$
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Stephen M. Kosslyn

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195311846

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311846.001.0001

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Creating Line-Graph Variants and Scatterplots

Creating Line-Graph Variants and Scatterplots

Chapter:
(p.141) 6 Creating Line-Graph Variants and Scatterplots
Source:
Graph Design for the Eye and Mind
Author(s):

Stephen M. Kosslyn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195311846.003.0006

Line graphs and their variants have an L-shaped framework. In this chapter, more guidelines on how to create labels of their content elements are provided. Line graphs are best used to show quantities that change over time. They are represented by a contiguous line. Pieces of advice on drawing the line, as well as certain techniques to represent different lines on the same plot, are given. Proper labeling and inclusion of error bars are described. Layer graphs are sets of very narrow stacked bars that are put together. Recommendations are provided as to their shading and layering to differentiate them from normal line graphs. Finally, scatterplots use dots and symbols to pertain to discrete points which correspond to measurements. Guidelines on drawing, line-fitting, and labeling are provided.

Keywords:   line graphs, line graph variants, scatterplots, layer graphs, error bars

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