Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Self-TransformationsFoucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Cressida J. Heyes

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195310535

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195310535.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 May 2019

Feminist Solidarity after Feminist Solidarity after Queer Theory

Feminist Solidarity after Feminist Solidarity after Queer Theory

The Case of Transgender

Chapter:
(p.38) 2 Feminist Solidarity after Queer Theory
Source:
Self-Transformations
Author(s):

Cressida J. Heyes (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195310535.003.0003

This chapter addresses the issue of how — in theory and in practice — feminism should engage bisexuality, intersexuality, transsexuality, transgender, and other emergent identities (or anti-identities) that reconfigure both conventional and conventionally feminist understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. How feminists should imagine and create communities that take the institutions and practices of sex, gender, and sexuality to be politically relevant to freedom, or how might such communities incorporate our manifest and intransigent diversity, and build solidarity, is discussed with reference to the leitmotif of transgender. A critical analysis is made of two very different feminist texts: the 1994 reissue of Janice Raymond's notorious The Transsexual Empire: The Making of the She-Male (originally published in 1979) and Bernice Hausman's 1995 book Changing Sex: Transsexualism, Technology, and the Idea of Gender. This chapter shows that the differences between the ethical and political dilemmas faced by feminists who are transgendered and those who are not are not as great as some theorists have suggested.

Keywords:   feminism, queer theory, solidarity, transgender, transsexuality, gender identity, trans liberation, Janice Raymond, Bernice Hausman

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .