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Sounds of the MetropolisThe 19th Century Popular Music Revolution in London, New York, Paris and Vienna$
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Derek B. Scott

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195309461

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309461.001.0001

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A Revolution on the Dance Floor, a Revolution in Musical Style

A Revolution on the Dance Floor, a Revolution in Musical Style

The Viennese Waltz

Chapter:
(p.117) 5 A Revolution on the Dance Floor, a Revolution in Musical Style
Source:
Sounds of the Metropolis
Author(s):

Derek B. Scott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309461.003.0005

This chapter examines evidence for the claim that the 19th-century Viennese version of the waltz stimulated the development of a revolutionary kind of popular music that created a schism between entertainment music (Unterhaltungsmusik) and serious music (Ernste Musik). Lanner and Strauss, especially the latter, saw the possibility of a popular revolution in music and created a style that was often consciously at odds with the art music of its time. It was a style that gave new meaning to entertainment music: the thesis here being that the concept of the “popular” began to embrace, for the first time, not only the musicés reception, but also the presence of specific features of style. This chapter analyzes the musical features that appear in the Viennese waltz and examines the sociocultural context of its reception.

Keywords:   business, city, class, dance, dancing, Lanner, Strauss, style, Unterhaltungsmusik, Ernste, Vienna

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