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Wine and Conversation$
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Adrienne Lehrer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195307931

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307931.001.0001

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Snobs, Anti-Snobs, and Marketing

Snobs, Anti-Snobs, and Marketing

Chapter:
(p.230) 16 Snobs, Anti-Snobs, and Marketing
Source:
Wine and Conversation
Author(s):

Adrienne Lehrer (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307931.003.0016

Wine culture, according to Robert Fuller, shares features with popular religion: a special vocabulary, ritualized behaviors, and ceremonies. Although wine drinking has become popular, there are still elements of elitism. Wine marketing sometimes uses snob appeal, but just as often makes fun of snobbery. Names of wines and wineries has become colorful and entertaining, partly to attract customers, but also as a larger part of the word-play in contemporary advertising. Many wines and wineries use animal names (Yellowtail, Black Swan, Funky Llama), and some are puns, like Bored Doe. Although choosing wines to complement food has always been a concern, greater attention and specificity has recently been applied to food-wine pairings; not just red wine with meat, but a Australian Shiraz with grilled rib lamb chops marinated in a mustard cream sauce.

Keywords:   snobs, marketing, popular religion, wine names, winery names, word-play, food-wine pairings

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