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Wine and Conversation$
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Adrienne Lehrer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195307931

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307931.001.0001

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Nonscientific Uses of Language

Nonscientific Uses of Language

Chapter:
(p.213) 15 Nonscientific Uses of Language
Source:
Wine and Conversation
Author(s):

Adrienne Lehrer (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307931.003.0015

Some wine talk has an aesthetic function. Isenberg, discussing art criticism, shows that the critic tries to get the perceiver to see or hear some non-obvious aspects of a work of art. He calls this critical communication. When wine drinkers discuss the wines they drink together, they are also engaging in critical communication. Discussion among the Tucson subjects showed that much of the wine talk served this purpose. Another function of wine talk involves phatic communion, where the emphasis is on social bonding, created by shared experiences in wine drinking. Analyses of the Tucson subjects' discussions also showed much humor, making the experiences more fun. Discourse features of these conversations are also discussed.

Keywords:   Isenberg, aesthetic functions, critical communication, phatic communion, humor, discourse

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