Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Muslims, Christians, and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jane I. Smith

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195307313

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307313.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 November 2019

 Islam

 Islam

A Truly American Religion?

Chapter:
(p.41) 3 Islam
Source:
Muslims, Christians, and the Challenge of Interfaith Dialogue
Author(s):

Jane Idleman Smith (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195307313.003.0003

American Muslims comprise the most diverse Islamic community that has ever existed. They are immigrants and American born, with more than 30 percent of their population African Americans. Most are Sunni, though Shi̒ites have increased to about 20 percent. Some American Muslims hope to keep alive in their religious practices customs from their country of origin, while others are looking for ways to formulate an American Islam that is at home in the West. Most American Muslims are orthodox in belief and practice, although America fosters a wide range of heterodox movements that often claim to be Muslim. This chapter asks who American Muslims are, what are their major issues and concerns, and in what ways have they been involved in Christian-Muslim dialogue.

Keywords:   Sunni, Shi̒ite, ummah, immigration, Nation of Islam, Warith Deen Mohammed, mosque, prejudice, Muslim women, conversion

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .