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Juvenile Justice in the Making$
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David S. Tanenhaus

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195306507

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195306507.001.0001

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Legitimating Juvenile Justice

Legitimating Juvenile Justice

Chapter:
(p.82) Four Legitimating Juvenile Justice
Source:
Juvenile Justice in the Making
Author(s):

David S. Tanenhaus

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195306507.003.0004

This chapter discusses the administration of juvenile justice. By passing the Funds to Parents in July 1911, the Illinois General Assembly not only allowed the Chicago Juvenile Court to begin construction of the two-track system for handling the cases of dependent children but also further politicized the administration of juvenile justice. Substantial increases in the system's budget, including the hiring of more probation officers to run the new welfare program, encouraged machine politicians to view the juvenile court as a rich source from which to distribute jobs and pension funds to supporters; in addition, critics of the court attacked its handling of dependency cases in order to challenge the basic premises of progressive juvenile justice.

Keywords:   juvenile court, juvenile justice, Chicago Juvenile Court, welfare

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