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AttentionFrom Theory to Practice$
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Arthur F. Kramer, Douglas A. Wiegmann, and Alex Kirlik

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195305722

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305722.001.0001

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Cross-Modal Interactions between Sensory Modalities: Implications for the Design of Multisensory Displays

Cross-Modal Interactions between Sensory Modalities: Implications for the Design of Multisensory Displays

Chapter:
(p.196) Chapter 14 Cross-Modal Interactions between Sensory Modalities: Implications for the Design of Multisensory Displays
Source:
Attention
Author(s):

Jan Theeuwes

Erik van der Burg

Christian N. L. Olivers

Adelbert Bronkhorst

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305722.003.0014

Research on multisensory integration focused on interactions between the modalities occurring within a single task. A completely different line of research has concentrated on multisensory separation using dual-task paradigms looking specifically at how well people can perform two tasks at the same time. An obvious example of a structural distinction is between the eyes (visual processing) and the ears (auditory processing). This chapter summarizes the results of research on cross-modal interactions between sensory modalities and the implications for the design of multisensory displays. This study closely monitored the time course of visual-auditory processing interactions while keeping local sensory-masking effects constant. The research used the attentional blink paradigm to investigate the mechanisms underlying cross-modal interactions. The findings support the multiple-resource theory's assumption of independent resources for auditory and visual processing. However, the research also indicates that cross-modal interference can occur when central processing is necessary for information consolidation.

Keywords:   cross-modal interactions, sensory modalities, visual-auditory processing, multisensory displays, attentional blink paradigm, multiple-resource theory, cross-modal interference, information consolidation, central processing

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