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AttentionFrom Theory to Practice$
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Arthur F. Kramer, Douglas A. Wiegmann, and Alex Kirlik

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195305722

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305722.001.0001

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Multiple-Resource Theory as a Basis for Multimodal Interface Design: Success Stories, Qualifications, and Research Needs

Multiple-Resource Theory as a Basis for Multimodal Interface Design: Success Stories, Qualifications, and Research Needs

Chapter:
(p.187) Chapter 13 Multiple-Resource Theory as a Basis for Multimodal Interface Design: Success Stories, Qualifications, and Research Needs
Source:
Attention
Author(s):

Nadine Sarter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305722.003.0013

To date, the design of most multimodal displays appears to have been based—implicitly or explicitly—on the original version of Christopher Wickens' multiple-resource theory (MRT). Based on MRT, the concurrent performance of multiple tasks should benefit to the extent that information related to these tasks is presented in different modalities and thus resource competition is reduced. Although the mechanisms underlying improved time-sharing with cross-modal task and information presentation continue to be a matter of research and debate, the phenomenon itself has been confirmed and exploited in a number of research and development efforts. This chapter presents examples of the successful implementation of multimodal interfaces in support of concurrent task performance and information processing. It describes additional benefits of distributing information across sensory channels, including redundancy, complementarity, and substitution. Finally, critical research needs in the area of multimodal information processing and interface design are discussed.

Keywords:   Christopher Wickens, multiple-resource theory, multimodal interfaces, information processing, time-sharing, interface design, sensory channels, redundancy, complementarity, substitution

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