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Everyday ReligionObserving Modern Religious Lives$
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Nancy T. Ammerman

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195305418

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305418.001.0001

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 Religion as Communication: The Changing Shape of Catholicism in Europe

 Religion as Communication: The Changing Shape of Catholicism in Europe

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 Religion as Communication: The Changing Shape of Catholicism in Europe
Source:
Everyday Religion
Author(s):

Enzo Pace

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195305418.003.0002

In many European countries, religion today seems to function as guardian of the collective identity and memory, even as those same societies are becoming more multi-religious. Focusing the analysis on European Catholicism and, particularly, on the new role played by the Catholic Church in the public sphere in two historically Catholic countries — Italy and Spain — the chapter develops the hypothesis that Catholic leaders are accepting the idea that religious power must work more and more as communication. They can longer impose norms, but they can reconstruct a romantic sense of being a society, a collective identity rooted in the Christian pattern of values, projecting unity where there is social, religious, and ideological difference.

Keywords:   Catholicism, Italy, Spain, collective identity, communication

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