Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Population Genetics, Linguistics, and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jonathan S. Friedlaender

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195300307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300307.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 August 2019

Inferring Prehistory from Genetic, Linguistic, and Geographic Variation

Inferring Prehistory from Genetic, Linguistic, and Geographic Variation

Chapter:
(p.141) 9 Inferring Prehistory from Genetic, Linguistic, and Geographic Variation
Source:
Population Genetics, Linguistics, and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific
Author(s):

Keith Hunley

Michael Dunn

Eva Lindström

Ger Reesink

Angela Terrill

Heather Norton

Laura Scheinfeldt

Françoise R. Friedlaender

D. Andrew Merriwether

George Koki

Jonathan S. Friedlaender

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300307.003.0009

This chapter investigates the fit of genetic, phenotypic, and linguistic data to two well-known models of population history. The first of these models, termed the population fissions model, emphasizes population splitting, isolation, and independent evolution. It predicts that genetic and linguistic data will be perfectly tree-like. The second model, termed isolation by distance, emphasizes genetic exchange among geographically proximate populations. It predicts a monotonic decline in genetic similarity with increasing geographic distance. While these models are overly simplistic, deviations from them were expected to provide important insights into the population history of northern Island Melanesia. The chapter finds scant support for either model because the prehistory of the region has been so complex. Nonetheless, the genetic and linguistic data are consistent with an early radiation of proto-Papuan speakers into the region followed by a much later migration of Austronesian speaking peoples. While these groups subsequently experienced substantial genetic and cultural exchange, this exchange has been insufficient to erase this history of separate migrations.

Keywords:   population fissions, isolation by distance, Northern Island Melanesia, genetic cultural exchange, migration

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .