Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Moving to Markets in Environmental RegulationLessons from Twenty Years of Experience$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jody Freeman and Charles D. Kolstad

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195189650

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189650.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 December 2019

 “No Net Loss”: Instrument Choice in Wetlands Protection

 “No Net Loss”: Instrument Choice in Wetlands Protection

Chapter:
(p.323) 12 “No Net Loss”: Instrument Choice in Wetlands Protection
Source:
Moving to Markets in Environmental Regulation
Author(s):

James Salzman

J. B. Ruhl

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189650.003.0012

This essay evaluates wetlands mitigation banking (WMB) as a tool for accomplishing the policy of no net loss of the nation's wetlands. The first part describes the legal and historical background to wetlands mitigation banking, identifying the expected advantages and highlighting the practical difficulties. The discussion then focuses on the three main limitations of WMB design: ensuring meaningful compliance monitoring, currency adequacy, and exchange adequacy. These theoretical concerns are tested by looking at experiences to date in the field. Finally, key lessons for market-based approaches to watershed protection are drawn out.

Keywords:   wetlands mitigation banking, wetlands compensatory mitigation, environmental policy, compliance monitoring, current adequacy, exchange adequacy

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .