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Integrated Models of Cognitive Systems$
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Wayne D. Gray

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195189193

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189193.001.0001

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Integrated Models of Driver Behavior

Integrated Models of Driver Behavior

Chapter:
(p.356) 24 Integrated Models of Driver Behavior
Source:
Integrated Models of Cognitive Systems
Author(s):

Dario D. Salvucci

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195189193.003.0024

As cognitive architectures continue to move forward toward more truly “unified theories of cognition,” integration has played and will continue to play a key role in their development. At least two distinct types of integration, known as integration by composition and integration by generalization, have become evident in recent work on cognitive architecture. This chapter discusses three examples of integration within this work on driver behavior: integration by composition of a lower-level control model into a production-system model for highway driving, integration by composition of the driver model with models of in-vehicle secondary tasks to predict driver distraction, and integration by generalization of the multitasking aspects of the previous models into a general executive for handling multitask performance. This integration has facilitated the development of practical systems that use these theories in real-world applications, such as predicting the distraction potential of novel in-vehicle devices.

Keywords:   cognitive architecture, cognition, integration, integration by composition, integration by generalization, driver behavior, highway driving, driver distraction, multitasking, multitask performance

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