Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Understanding EventsFrom Perception to Action$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thomas F. Shipley and Jeffrey M. Zacks

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195188370

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195188370.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 July 2019

Shining Spotlights, Zooming Lenses, Grabbing Hands, and Pecking Chickens: The Ebb and Flow of Attention During Events

Shining Spotlights, Zooming Lenses, Grabbing Hands, and Pecking Chickens: The Ebb and Flow of Attention During Events

Chapter:
(p.522) 19 Shining Spotlights, Zooming Lenses, Grabbing Hands, and Pecking Chickens: The Ebb and Flow of Attention During Events
Source:
Understanding Events
Author(s):

Daniel T. Levin

Megan M. Saylor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195188370.003.0022

This chapter proposes a new metaphor to guide research on visual attention: instead of a spotlight, hand, or zoom lens, attention is sometimes better likened to a pecking chicken. This metaphor may capture visual attention in situations where it only sometimes samples the visual world and does not track all objects over space and time. A set of metaphors for visual attention is reviewed and some of the ways in which these metaphors arise from the tasks used to study visual attention are discussed. Research documenting a range of failures of visual awareness that has questioned this understanding is described. Some implications for a model of attention that is less continuous than previous models but which produces a close link between knowledge and perceptual information during the specific moments when perceivers need to understand a visual scene are discussed.

Keywords:   visual attention, metaphor, visual awareness, model of attention, knowledge, perceptual information

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .