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Finding an EndingReflections on Wagner’s Ring$
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Philip Kitcher and Richard Schacht

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195183603

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195183603.001.0001

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Authority and Judgment in Don Giovanni

Authority and Judgment in Don Giovanni

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 Authority and Judgment in Don Giovanni
Source:
Finding an Ending
Author(s):

Philip Kitcher

Richard Schacht

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195183603.003.0003

As we may observe in the play Don Giovanni, Leporello, despite his many statements and attempts of leaving his master, was never really able to push through with his plans of leaving. This is because the Don, Leporello’s master, had directive authority—the ability for one to make things happen through employing his vision of certain things on others. Directive authority can be derived from not just power and brute strength but also, in some instances, even charm, charisma, and forcefulness. The lack of directive authority possessed by Leporello is also shared by those who judge the Don because more often than not, the judgments made about the Don are negative. Despite all the negative connotations associated with the Don, these barely have impact on the Don’s actions as he continuously pushes through with his allegedly evil doings.

Keywords:   Don Giovanni, Don, Leporello, directive authority, judgment, power

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