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John Wyclif$
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Stephen Edmund Lahey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195183313

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195183313.001.0001

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THE OXFORD CONTEXT OF WYCLIF’S THOUGHT

THE OXFORD CONTEXT OF WYCLIF’S THOUGHT

Chapter:
(p.32) 2 THE OXFORD CONTEXT OF WYCLIF’S THOUGHT
Source:
John Wyclif
Author(s):

Stephen E. Lahey (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195183313.003.0002

Wyclif’s philosophical thought followed a period of remarkable innovation in the history of medieval philosophy, when the Ockhamist movement challenged the Aristotelian synthesis of Thomist and Scotist theologians. From the 1320s, Oxford thinkers like Thomas Bradwardine and the Mertonian Calculators had developed a rigorous logical method of analysis for the exploration of semantics and Aristotelian physics. Their analytic approach, in part inspired by Ockham’s logic, characterized Oxford philosophy and theology well into the 1370s. This chapter explores the relation of Wyclif’s epistemology, with attention to his fondness for analogy to the science of optics, to his understanding of the nature of science in the context of his predecessors in Oxford’s “Golden Age of Theology.” Foremost among these predecessors are Adam Wodeham, William Crathorn, Robert Holcot, and Richard Fitzralph.

Keywords:   Mertonian Calculators, Ockham, epistemology, certainty, logic, optics, Wodeham, Holcot, Crathorn, Fitzralph

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