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Vaughan Williams on Music$
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David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

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Sinfonia Antartica

Sinfonia Antartica

Chapter:
(p.371) Chapter 88 Sinfonia Antartica
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0089

The Sinfonia Antartica was suggested by the film Scott of the Antarctic, which was produced by Ealing Studios a few years ago. Some of the themes are derived from my incidental music to that film. The Musical Director was Ernest Irving. The Sinfonia is therefore gratefully dedicated to him. A large orchestra is used, including a vibraphone, a wind machine, and women's voices used orchestrally. There are five movements: Prelude, Scherzo, Landscape, Intermezzo, and Epilogue. Each movement is headed by an appropriate quotation. Other themes follow leading to a big climax. The bell passage comes in again, suddenly very soft. The voices are heard again and the opening flourish, first loud and then soft, leads to a complete repetition of the beginning of the Prelude. Then the solo singer is heard again and the music dies down to nothing, except for the voices and the Antarctic wind.

Keywords:   Sinfonia Antartica, Ealing Studios, Ernest Irving, orchestra, Prelude, Scherzo, Landscape, Intermezzo, Epilogue

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