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Vaughan Williams on Music$
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David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

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Introductory Talk to Holst Memorial Concert

Introductory Talk to Holst Memorial Concert

Chapter:
(p.298) (p.299) Chapter 67 Introductory Talk to Holst Memorial Concert
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0068

This chapter discusses an introductory talk given at the Holst Memorial Concert, a musical tribute to the great composer, Gustav Holst. Holst was a visionary, but, at the same time, in all essentials a very practical man. He himself used to say that only second-rate artists were unbusinesslike. It is the blend of the visionary with the realist that gives his music its distinctive character. Holst's life gave the lie to the notion that a composer must shut himself away from his fellows and live in a world of dreams. However, he never allowed his dreams to become incoherent or meandering. While he was still young, Holst was strongly attracted by the ideals of William Morris and, though in later years, he discarded the medievalism of that teacher, and the ideal of comradeship remained with him throughout his life.

Keywords:   Holst Memorial Concert, Gustav Holst, William Morris, medievalism, comradeship, music

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