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Vaughan Williams on Music$
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David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

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Martin Shaw

Martin Shaw

Chapter:
(p.275) Chapter 60 Martin Shaw
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0061

Martin Shaw has devoted himself to the cause of church music from the time he met Percy Dearmer, and they worked together to rescue English church music from the slough of despond into which the Victorian fondness for sacharine insincerity had led it. Shaw shows the way, not only by precept but by practice. His anthems and services are models of what such things should be; particularly, this chapter likes to give tribute of praise to his beautiful Passion Cantata, The Redeemer, which ought to be sung every year in every church by a competent choir, and thus replace the sentimentalities by composers with ridiculous names that at present mar their Lenten services. He is best known by his hymn tunes. The chapter also pays tribute to Joan Shaw, who stood by him for better or for worse through a long and arduous life.

Keywords:   Martin Shaw, church music, Percy Dearmer, Passion Cantata, The Redeemer, hymn tunes, Joan Shaw

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