Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Vaughan Williams on Music$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 June 2019

Cecil Sharp’s Accompaniments

Cecil Sharp’s Accompaniments

Chapter:
(p.233) Chapter 47 Cecil Sharp’s Accompaniments
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0048

It has sometimes been questioned whether Cecil Sharp had the creative impulse in music, but his accompaniments to my mind clearly show that he had. His creative impulse came from the tune he was setting. In all the best of Sharp's accompaniments it is the tune that counts, and the arrangement falls into its proper background. In some cases his accompaniments look wrong, and sometimes even when played by themselves seem awkward, but they stand the important test: that they make the tune sound right. It is true that Sharp had little of the conventional technique of pianoforte accompaniment, as taught by professors of composition, but he developed a technique of his own whose complete success was only hindered by his fear of the harmony professor. As examples of first-rate accompaniments this book suggests “The Cuckoo,” “The Drowned Lover,” and “The Water is Wide.”

Keywords:   Cecil Sharp, music, accompaniments, tune, pianoforte, The Cuckoo, Drowned Lover, Water is Wide

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .