Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Vaughan Williams on Music$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 June 2019

Howland Medal Lecture

Howland Medal Lecture

Chapter:
(p.98) (p.99) Chapter 22 Howland Medal Lecture
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0023

The Howland Medal has already been presented to two distinguished musicians: Paul Hindemith and Gustav Holst. This chapter discusses that although lectures on music are dreary things at the best, a lecture on music, merely talking about music, would be quite implausible. It describes the Howland Medal lecture, which speaks about making one's own music. All vital art is creative art; and musical appreciation especially demands active participation rather than passive acceptance on the part of the hearer. When one listens to a symphony, one is actually taking part in it, together with the composer and the performers. One is taking part in the creation of that symphony. William Shakespeare wrote some very beautiful lines about letting soft music steal in the ears, but this is not a true picture. Before one can truly listen, one must be able also to create.

Keywords:   Howland Medal, Paul Hindemith, Gustav Holst, Howland Medal lecture, vital art, creative art, musical appreciation, music

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .