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Vaughan Williams on Music$
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David Manning

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195182392

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.001.0001

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Art and Organisation

Art and Organisation

Chapter:
(p.91) Chapter 19 Art and Organisation
Source:
Vaughan Williams on Music
Author(s):

David Manning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195182392.003.0020

This chapter knows on the best authority that the wise thrush sings every song through twice, and this cannot be done without some amount of organization. Or take the case of the solitary reaper. She does not require a committee to help her sing her melancholy strain. However, the reaper was solitary. Supposing 20 reapers all wished to sing together of old, unhappy, far-off things. Would they not have to invoke the aid of the paraphernalia of organization with all its dreary but necessary jargon of local authorities, questionnaires, and the like? The chapter supposes that even anything so primitive as one cuckoo answering another involves some arrangement. Indeed, it fears that the cuckoos even have to “contact” each other. In this regard, organization is not art, but art cannot flourish without it.

Keywords:   organization, solitary reaper, committee, melancholy strain, cuckoos, art

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