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The Ghost of Jim CrowHow Southern Moderates Used Brown v Board of Education to Stall the Civil Rights Movement$
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Anders Walker

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195181746

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181746.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 August 2019

The Processes of Law: Collins, Hodges, and Coleman Join the Federal Government

The Processes of Law: Collins, Hodges, and Coleman Join the Federal Government

Chapter:
(p.117) 4 The Processes of Law: Collins, Hodges, and Coleman Join the Federal Government
Source:
The Ghost of Jim Crow
Author(s):

Anders Walker (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181746.003.0005

This chapter takes the story into the post-massive resistance era, the 1960s and beyond, when Hodges, Collins, and Coleman all rose to positions in the federal government. Luther Hodges became President John F. Kennedy's secretary of Commerce and LeRoy Collins rose to become head of the Community Relations Service, an agency dedicated to negotiating peaceful conclusions to civil rights demonstrations. Meanwhile, Lyndon Johnson appointed J. P. Coleman to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, where he would find himself presiding over civil rights cases for the next two decades, into the 1980s.

Keywords:   Southern moderates, racial segregation, federal government, civil rights, J. P. Coleman, Luther Hodges, LeRoy Collins

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